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Allison Williams Williams Law Group Family Law, Divorce, Custody & Support
As an attorney, it has always been, and will always be, about helping people. I'm passionate about my clients and I aggressively represent them. The Williams Law Group uses ethical means to create winning strategies. If you have a legal issue/s, we'd like to hear your message!
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Cultivating Empathy for the Alienating Parent

As someone who has been victimized by alienating behavior – or who believes that you’ve been victimized – you may find it very challenging to conjure empathy for the other parent. After all, this person is (you believe) trying to destroy your relationship with your child! However, you may find empathy to be a very useful tool not only to control your emotions but also to cultivate insights into...

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What Inspires Parents to Become Alienators in the First Place?

Given the damage that Parental Alienation causes not just the children caught in the middle and the targeted parents but also the alienating parents themselves, why would anyone engage in this strategy? Here are six reasons that clinicians have observed: 1. The parent develops inaccurate beliefs about key family relationships. For instance, maybe while you were in the midst of divorce, the...

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Positive, Negative and Partial Reinforcement

Dr. Richard Gardner, who’s largely credited for bringing Parental Alienation to the attention of the legal and psychological community, cataloged alienating behavior in three ways. 1. Positive reinforcement This strategy involves rewarding the child’s behavior, words or actions when the child “goes along” with the alienation. For instance, let’s say the child says something to the effect of...

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Family Bridges: Healing Families Affected by Severe Alienation

Fortunately, most cases of parental alienation are not so severe that the damage cannot be unwound through skilled, timely therapeutic intervention. However, in special cases – in which alienators are particularly relentless or egregious, or where the child is uniquely susceptible to the brainwashing – more formally structured assistance may be needed. Dr. Richard Warshak developed a program...

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Keep the Home Environment Stable

Children are far more resilient than many parents realize. For instance, children caught in a divorce can experience temporary setbacks at school, loss of motivation, depression and anxiety. However, these symptoms generally go away on their own, and most children of divorce rebound afterwards to exhibit similar levels of motivation, happiness and responsibility to those of their peers from...

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Association Studies — Their Usefulness and Their Limits

Researchers must use more blunt scientific tools to understand the effects of things like Parental Alienation on kids. Many researchers use what are known as “association studies” to try to get this clarity. They compare populations against one another, looking for trends. What similarities can we find among kids subjected to alienation? How do these children, in general, differ from the...

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How, Exactly, Does Alienation Impact a Child’s Development?

What are the long and short-term effects of parental alienation on the children themselves? Obviously, every child is different, and every alienation situation is likewise unique. The severity of the alienation, its duration, the child’s level of attachment (or lack thereof) to both parents, the child’s relationships with siblings and peers, the child’s overall health and diet, and the child’s...

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Common Tactics Used to Brainwash Their Children

In 2006, authors Baker & Darnall catalogued 66 behaviors that alienating parents use to convince their children of the wrongness or badness of the other parent. Here are nine examples of these tactics: The alienator interferes with communication between the child and the other parent. For instance, he or she may read and delete your emails, prevent phone conversations, or even get in the way...

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Categorizing and Classifying Alienators

Experts often grade alienation along two distinct dimensions. On the “X” axis, we could graph the intensity of the alienation, which might range from mild to severe. On the “Y” axis, we could graph the intentionality of the alienation. Does the alienating parent have control of his or her behavior or not?   In 1998, scholar Douglas Darnall came up with another useful categorization; he...

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Is It Alienation or Estrangement? 6 Reasons Your Child May Reject You

As we discussed earlier, children can reject their parents for many reasons, including another parent’s brainwashing. However, sometimes the rejection has little or nothing to do with the other parent. Closely examine your situation to determine what’s actually going on before you take action, legal or otherwise. Here are 6 reasons why your child may be rejecting you – or at least acting coldly...

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